Arlene goldbard memory money persistence

The idea that art can make society more just, equitable, and democratic is hardly an artifact of the sixties though I admit I am. The impulse to instruct—to take note, to rebuke, to celebrate—was probably part of the first story ever told.

Arlene goldbard memory money persistence

To tell the truth, I'm a little tired of going by myself. Looking back, I am simultaneously touched by the intensity of my generation's hopes and appalled at the hyperinflated idealism that fueled them.

The idea that art can make society more just, equitable, and democratic is hardly an artifact of the sixties though I admit I am. The impulse to instruct--to take note, to rebuke, to celebrate--was probably part of the first story ever told. But our claims for art's power to effect social transformation were among the grandest ever made, and our efforts to put them into practice were prodigious.

The thing is, correcting for youthful hyperbole, I still believe most of these claims.

Arlene goldbard memory money persistence

With my own eyes, I've seen theater mobilize a community, alter the self-image of its members, peel back layers of disinformation to expose galvanizing truths. When I began work on this essay, I immediately wanted to revisit a particular moment in the history of progressive theater, one richly encrusted with both personal and political associations.

I made my way to our archives to pry a pile of folders out of the drawer labeled "Minnesota. Peter, a small town in southern Minnesota.

In late Don Adams and I were directors of a coalition of artists and organizations dedicated to cultural democracy: Out of the blue, theater people across the country suddenly began receiving invitations to an impressive-sounding event sponsored by a theater group called Cherry Creek, which no one had heard of before.

At around the same time, Cherry Creek launched a bimonthly publication, Theaterwork, featuring coverage of progressive performance work. The phone calls began: Who were these people? Where did they get the money to bring so many companies to Minnesota?

Should their invitation [End Page ] be accepted? We checked them out, but no evidence of Moonie or CIA taint turned up--and a year after Ronald Reagan had taken office, few of us were inclined to ignore what seemed to be an encouraging sign of life in our movement.

The Gathering was programmed to within an inch of its life. The week started off with a parade and pageant of masked figures and giant puppets Cherry Creek's rhetoric favored rustic grandiloquence; the parade was entitled "Let the Bird of the Earth Fly!

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Arlene goldbard memory money persistence

View freely available titles:Memory, Money, and Persistence: Theater of Social Change in Context. Arlene Goldbard. Arlene Goldbard.

Search for other works by this author on: Audio; Supplementary Data; Cite. Citation. Arlene Goldbard; Memory, Money, and Persistence: Theater of Social Change in Context.

Theater 1 November ; 31 (3).

American activists

Arlene Goldbard is a writer, social activist and consultant whose focus is the intersection of culture, politics, and spirituality. [1] She is best known as an advocate for cultural democracy and a creator of cultural critique and new cultural policy proposals.

Theater and Social Change An issue of: Theater Memory, Money, and Persistence: Theater of Social Change in Context–Arlene Goldbard. Agitational Performance, Now and Then–Claudia Orenstein. What Do We Want to Achieve? The Gospel According to Billy–Jonathan Kalb. Goldbard: Memory, Money and Persistence — 3/12/04 Page 5 Meanwhile, beginning in the late s, federal, state, and local governments responded to urban unrest and growing dissidence by supporting constructive outlets for disenfranchised youth, jobs for the structurally unemployed, and amenities for depressed communities.

Arlene Goldbard and John Seabrook probably would not deny that the arts can be used for political ends, yet both writers also suggest that we can experience art on an individual, emotional level where there does not seem to be any political message influencing us.

Goldbard: Memory, Money and Persistence — 3/12/04 Page 5 Meanwhile, beginning in the late s, federal, state, and local governments responded to urban unrest and growing dissidence by supporting constructive outlets for disenfranchised youth, jobs for the structurally unemployed, and amenities for depressed communities.

Arlene Goldbard - ashio-midori.com