An introduction to the issue of male hatred towards women and sexism in the workplace

By Eric Jaffe 6 minute Read The firing of Jill Abramson from the New York Times brought renewed attention to the topic of gender workplace bias, at least for a fleeting cultural moment.

An introduction to the issue of male hatred towards women and sexism in the workplace

It was never my intention to get so heavily involved in the issue of trans woman-inclusion in lesbian and women-only spaces.

The extent of gender variance

At the time, I was voraciously reading everything I could get my hands on related to transgender experiences and issues. As I read, I kept stumbling upon past instances of anti-trans discrimination from within the lesbian community.

These included derogatory anti-trans remarks by influential lesbian-feminist thinkers such as Mary Daly, Andrea Dworkin, and of course Janice Raymond, who wrote the infamous anti-trans diatribe The Transsexual Empire: After all, practically every facet of our society seemed to hate or fear trans people back then, and these incidents seemed more like a symptom of societal-wide transphobia rather than something unique or specific to the lesbian community.

And as someone who was giving thought to becoming involved in trans activism myself, there seemed to be plenty of other more practical and relevant issues for me to take up: But in the years that followed, I experienced a number of changes in my life that would considerably re-shape my views on this matter.

First, there was my transition. People are always fascinated about the more physical aspects of transitioning hormones, surgeries, etc. As I once wrote about my transition: On an intellectual level, I knew that it would not be easy, but I underestimated just how frustrating, infuriating and hurtful it would feel to have strangers regularly hurl cat calls and sexual innuendos at me, or to have men speak down to me, talk over me, and sometimes even practically put on baby-talk voices when addressing me.

Because I have the privilege of being able to pass as female, in my day-to-day life, when I am forced to come out to someone, nine times out of ten it is not as a transsexual, but as a lesbian. It happens when Dani is not around, but someone assumes that I am a dyke anyway because of the way that I dress, speak, or carry myself.

As a trans woman, it seemed impossible for me to discuss my journey from male to female without placing it in the context of the differing values our society places on maleness and femaleness, on masculinity and femininity. After all, growing up as a boy, I learned early on that few people in our culture are as easily ridiculed and so fiercely despised as feminine males.

I was sometimes teased for being different, for being an atypical or unmasculine boy, but it was nothing compared to venom that was reserved for those boys who acted downright feminine.

An introduction to the issue of male hatred towards women and sexism in the workplace

From my perspective, most of the anti-trans sentiment that I have had to deal with is probably better described as misogyny. This sense of ownership and entitlement about being a woman or being lesbian seemed hypocritical to me.

After all, as soon as we would walk out the door, both of us would face similar discrimination for being women and for being dykes. But what was most frustrating about the way that many of these women dismissed me was the fact that they seemed to have no problems at all with female-bodied folks expressing masculinity and with trans people on the female-to-male FTM spectrum attending their events.

However, this argument makes little sense when examined more closely. After all, how can someone who identifies as female and currently lives as a woman have less in common with women than a male-identified person who has male physical attributes and currently benefits from male privilege?anthropology; archaeology; architecture; art.

art criticism; literary criticism; film theory; biology; composition studies; criminology. pathways perspective; economics. Racism And Sexism: A More Serious Issue Than Sexism Words | 7 Pages.

Racism and sexism are terms that have been debatable for centuries.

Terminology

Many argue that there is not a difference between the two. Some feel as though racism is a more serious issue than sexism and vice versa. Sexism against women is an issue that is happening all over the world, including Australia.

Sexism can be defined as judging and treating a person because of their sex.

An introduction to the issue of male hatred towards women and sexism in the workplace

Sexism against women can be found all of Australia in many different environments. These include, in the workplace, at . On the Outside Looking In is a 36 page chapbook containing 4 essays and 1 letter providing a trans woman's perspective on feminism and the exclusion of trans women from lesbian and women-only spaces, published June , Hot Tranny Action press (Oakland, CA).

*note: for my more recent thoughts, writings and rants related to the issue of trans woman-inclusion in lesbian and women-only . Sexism in education is clearly associated with sexism in the workplace. When women are expected to “stay in the home,” they are unable to access the necessary educational resources to compete with men in the job market.

Liberal feminism asserts the equality of men and women through political and legal reform. It is an individualistic form of feminism and feminist theory, which focuses on women’s ability to show and maintain their equality through their own actions and choices.

Sexism - Wikipedia