A case study of australia s megafauna

A biography of the Australian continent Megafauna Extinction According to Floodabout 50 species of large animals, the megafauna, including marsupials, reptiles and birds, went extinct in Australia in the lastyears, about 41 going extinct in the Late Pleistocene. Most of the macropods that went extinct were browsers, as was the Diprotodon.

A case study of australia s megafauna

Highlighting recently published papers selected by Academy members Journal Club: Illustration by Peter Trusler, Monash University. A huge flightless bird known as Genyornis newtoni once roamed the Australian Outback along with a host of other giant animals.

Now scientists have unearthed what may be the first reliable evidence that humans contributed to the extinction of these gigantic birds: Genyornis was a 2-meter bird that some estimates suggest could reach up to kilograms in weight.

Previous research suggests that happened about 50, years ago on rafts launched from Indonesian islands several hundred kilometers away. The lack of clear evidence for humans preying on megafauna despite roughly 50 years of archaeological fieldwork has led some to question a human role in their extinction in Australia.

However, while Australia did see gradual drying between 60, and 40, years ago, megafauna there survived more extreme previous climate shifts, which suggests that aridity alone could not explain their extinction.

Now study lead author Gifford Miller at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and his colleagues suggest they have found the first reliable evidence that people once hunted the extinct Australian megafauna — cooked Genyornis eggs. The findings appear in the Jan 29 issue of Nature Communications. The scientists analyzed blackened Genyornis eggshell fragments from more than sites across most of the arid zone of Australia, from its west coast to its central deserts, mostly from sand dunes where the birds nested.

Previous research suggested the eggs were about the size of cantaloupes, weighing about 1. The scientists used the eggshell of Genyornis and Dromaius the emu to date ancient shorelines and sand dunes tied to expanded lakes.

But in the process, they accidentally dated when the big bird became extinct. Later they discovered the evidence that humans had eaten the eggs.

WHO | Case Study: Australia

The eggshell fragments were frequently blackened at only one end. Moreover, amino acid decomposition decreased away from the blackened ends. Both these findings suggest the eggs were in contact with a very hot, concentrated source of heat, such as an ember, instead of wildfires that would likely cook them all over.

In addition, the researchers found that many of the burnt eggshell fragments in tight clusters less than 3 meters in diameter. Some clusters had both burnt and unburnt eggshell fragments, a situation that would almost certainly never happen with natural wildfires.

The researchers suggest these fragments are evidence that humans preyed on the bird as they dispersed across the continent. Miller suspects that this paucity of fossil clues stems from not only the rarity of well-preserved kill sites, but the chemistry of Australian soils.Especially in the case of extinction of megafauna in Australia, several questions like the reasons for the disappearance of these creatures before humans even arrived and the reasons why the few survivors shrunk in size yet remain to be answered and the researches continue in .

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

8 - Megafauna in the Southern Lake Eyre Basin: A Case Study Pages - In a book of this nature there was a need to provide some detail of how megafauna lived in what is now seen as the most arid part of the most arid continent.

Another study examined the change in the methane concentration in the atmosphere at the end of the Pleistocene epoch after the extinction of megafauna in the Americas. After early humans migrated to the Americas about 13, BP, their hunting and other associated ecological impacts led to the extinction of many megafaunal species there.

This book presents the evidence of this theory, demonstrating the biogeographic approach to Australia’s megafauna extinction. Key Features Written clearly to benefit a diverse level of readers, from those with a passing interest to professionals in the field. This book presents the evidence of this theory, demonstrating the biogeographic approach to Australia’s megafauna extinction.

Building a reliable timeline

Key Features Written clearly to benefit a diverse level of readers, from those with a passing interest to professionals in the field. Australian megafauna comprises a number of large animal species in Australia, and uranium-thorium dating of megafaunal remains suggests that humans were the ultimate cause of the extinction of megafauna in Australia.

implying that at least in this case hunting was the most important factor.

A case study of australia s megafauna
Australian megafauna - Wikipedia